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Bach

Bach

Sergei Edelmann

Label: Triton (JP)
Format: SACD hybrid
Barcode: 4526977050214
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Catalog number: EXCL 21
Releasedate: 08-02-12
During his silence from the recording market, Sergei Edelmann had devoted a considerable amount of his time to teaching. Of course J.S.Bach is one of the most important composers students must learn, and it seems Mr.Edelmann has deepened and deepened his understanding to the music of great giant from Baroque period through long time of teaching, researching and analyzing. The playing of J.S.Bach in this recording is reflecting those profound cumulated understanding and experiences.
  • The Allemande is heavily encrusted with ornamental detail in both hands.
  • The Corrente (or Italian-style courante) moves lightly, with a regular pulse in the left hand, and the right hand for much of the time off the beat.
  • The first interpolated number is an Air, in gavotte time, with running quavers in each hand in turn and a little arpeggiated coda.
  • The Sarabande is even more lavishly decorated than the Allemande – another example of Bach’s skill as an improviser being transferred to the written or printed page.
  • The second “novelty number” is marked to be played in gavotte time, but its notation combines equal and dotted rhythms with triplets, so that for much of its length it has the effect of a gigue.
  • The final Gigue, on the other hand, is notated in dotted and equal rhythms, as if in 4/2 time: some players have reinterpreted the whole movement in traditional gigue time in the compound metre of 24/8; but gigues in duplet rhythms were not unknown in the Baroque period, and this performance retains Bach’s written note-values.
  • The movement is in three-part contrapuntal texture almost throughout, with a fugal opening which is turned upside-down at the beginning of the second half. “
 “In his lifetime, Johann Sebastian Bach was famous less as a composer than as a performer, on the organ and harpsichord, and in particular as an improviser.
Something of the impact he made on his fortunate listeners can be gleaned from the remarkable Chromatic Fantasia and Fugue in D minor [......] The work is “chromatic” in its free use of all twelve notes of the chromatic scale, suggesting the need for a tuning system similar to that required for the two volumes of preludes and fugues in all the keys called The Well-Tempered Clavier.
The quasi-improvisatory Fantasia moves freely through different keys, never coming to rest in the nominal home key until it closes on a chord of D major.
It includes dramatic runs, brilliant figuration divided between the hands, searching harmonic progressions notated as block chords to be freely arpeggiated by the player, and in its later stages a “Recitativ” of extraordinary harmonic mobility and harshness.
The Fugue is based on a subject containing two ascending chromatic scale figures and altogether including eleven of the twelve notes of the chromatic octave, and it too moves freely into remote keys.
Its strict three-part texture is relaxed for a couple of episodes of freer two-part writing, and a final burst of virtuosity recalling the Fantasia. [...] Both [Italian Concerto and French Suite] are translations into keyboard terms of forms associated with orchestral music – although the keyboard writing is so idiomatic that neither could ever be mistaken for an arrangement of an actual orchestral work.
...Markings of forte and piano indicate the use of the two keyboards of the harpsichord to differentiate between tutti and solo passages, and between solo and accompaniment.
The central D minor Andante consists of a long, floridly decorated melody over an ostinato accompaniment – a texture clearly devised for the harpsichord, with its lack of sustaining power, but equally well suited to the modern piano with its potential for subtle shading.
The finale is again in Venetian ritornello form, this time with a final “solo” episode recapitulating the material of the first two episodes, in reverse order, before the closing complete statement of the buoyant ritornello. [...] The Partita No. 6 in E minor is in many respects the most ambitious of the six, and it certainly makes no concessions, technical or musical, to the amateurs who were presumably its intended market.
It opens with a Toccata, which begins by alternating between quasi-improvisatory flourishes and rhythmic two-part writing, continues with an extended three-voice fugue, and finally returns to and expands on the opening flourishes.
The Allemande is heavily encrusted with ornamental detail in both hands.
The Corrente (or Italian-style courante) moves lightly, with a regular pulse in the left hand, and the right hand for much of the time off the beat.
The first interpolated number is an Air, in gavotte time, with running quavers in each hand in turn and a little arpeggiated coda.
The Sarabande is even more lavishly decorated than the Allemande – another example of Bach’s skill as an improviser being transferred to the written or printed page.
The second “novelty number” is marked to be played in gavotte time, but its notation combines equal and dotted rhythms with triplets, so that for much of its length it has the effect of a gigue.
The final Gigue, on the other hand, is notated in dotted and equal rhythms, as if in 4/2 time: some players have reinterpreted the whole movement in traditional gigue time in the compound metre of 24/8; but gigues in duplet rhythms were not unknown in the Baroque period, and this performance retains Bach’s written note-values.
The movement is in three-part contrapuntal texture almost throughout, with a fugal opening which is turned upside-down at the beginning of the second half. “
 Born in Lvov, Ukraine in 1960, Sergei Edelmann comes from a long and outstanding musical heritage; his father, Alexander Edelmann, renowned pianist and pedagogue, a pupil of both Felix Blumenfeld (professor of Vladimir Horowitz) and Heinrich Neuhaus (professor of Sviatoslav Richter) taught Sergei since the age of 5. In his native country, Sergei’s first orchestral performance was at the age of 10 playing Beethoven’s First Piano Concerto. He subsequently performed extensively in recitals and with orchestras throughout ex-USSR. Sergei Edelmann came to the United States in 1979. Within his first year here, he quickly established himself as a significant and highly acclaimed pianist of his generation. Not long after his debut performance in the United States, one of Los Angeles’s major concert critics described the excitement generated by Sergei’s performance: “Music reviewing, as a profession has its perils, but one of its rewards is the shock of unexpectedly stumbling onto great talent. That happened last night when this young pianist, Sergei Edelmann, gave a recital to our full house audience”. And, after his debut recital in Chicago’s Orchestra Hall, one of the most respected and feared musical critics, Claudia Cassidy, wrote in the Chicago Magazine: “Sergei Edelmann walked in the Orchestra Hall a stranger and out of it one to be cherished”. Sergei Edelmann has since become a leading artist both in the concert hall and in the recording studio. His BMG Classics/RCA Red Seal CDs with the Bamberg Symphony under the baton of Claus Peter Flor and the Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra with Paavo Berglund include both Mendelssohn concertos and the Strauss Burlesque, and his series of solo recordings of Beethoven, Schubert, Schumann, Chopin, and Prokofiev, have gathered enthusiastic critical acclaim. His solo recitals in the United States have included Chicago’s Orchestra Hall, New York’s 92nd Street “Y” and Metropolitan Museum of Arts, Pasadena’s Ambassador Auditorium among numerous others. In Europe he has performed in Paris, Amsterdam, Brussels, Madrid, Munich, Detmold, Frankfurt, Milan, Turin, Ferrara and in Asia he regularly appears in Tokyo, Taipei and Seoul. Mr.Edelmann has appeared with the Cleveland Orchestra, American Symphony Orchestra at the Carnegie Hall, the London Symphony Orchestra, the Orchestre de Paris, the Washington National Symphony Orchestra (at the invitation of Mstislav Rostropovich), the Toronto Symphony, the Dallas Symphony, Jerusalem Symphony, Haifa Philharmonic Orchestra, Mexico Philharmonic, Orchestra National de Buenos Aires in Teatro Colon, Saint Louis Symphony, Buffalo Philharmonic, Seattle Symphony, Orchestra Verdi in Milano with Vladimir Yurovsky, the Rotterdam Philharmonic with Valery Gergiev, the Maggio Musicale Festival of Florence, tour of Italy with Moscow Soloists under Yuri Bashmet, the National Symphony of Johannesburg and the Cape Town Philharmonic in South Africa and other major orchestras across Europe, the Far East, and North and South America. A true collaborator Mr.Edelmann enjoys festival appearances that afford him the opportunity to work with friends and colleagues. Among his chamber music partners: violinists Philip Hirshhorn, Dora Schwarzberg, Sergei Stadler, Alissa Vaitsner, clarinetists Michel Portal, Pascal Moragues, Julian Milkis and Paul Mayer, violoncellists Mario Brunello, Dmitri Yablonsky and Sviatoslav Zagursky. In France he has appeared in La Rocque d’Antheron, Tours, Dinard, Nancy, Sully and Radio France Montpelier music festivals. He is a regular guest at the Elba International Music Festival in Italy where, over several summer seasons Mr.Edelmann has collaborated with violist Yuri Bashmet, violinist Victor Tretyakov and cellist Mario Brunello. They premiered in Italy Gya Kantcelli’s Piano Quartet and Penderezky Sextet. In September of 2006, at the opening of 10th anniversary Festival, he performed the Schumann piano concerto with “New Russia” Symphony Orchestra conducted by Yuri Bashmet. Following that concert, Mr.Edelmann performed in the Mozart celebration concert with Moscow Soloists at the famed Great Hall of the Moscow Conservatory in December 2006. In January 2008 Mr.Edelmann was invited to be a soloist in J.Brahms Piano concerto No.2 with Sinfonia Warsovia under the direction of Peter Csaba for the tour of Italy. Other leading artists he has collaborated with include conductors Franz Paul Decker, Valery Gergiev, Claus Peter Flor, Lawrence Foster, Hans Graf, Gunther Herbig, Raymond Leppard, Yoel Levi, Vladimir Yurovsky, Eduardo Mata, Gerard Schwarz, Peter Csaba, Lawrence Leighton Smith, Semyon Bychkov, Catherine Comet and Maxim Shostakovich. Sergei Edelmann is a winner of the Young Concert Artists International Auditions, the Gina Bachauer Memorial Scholarship at Juilliard, and a major prizewinner of Belgium’s Queen Elizabeth International Competition. Mr.Edelmann is also the recipient of the prestigious 92nd Street YM-YWHA’s Shura Cherkassky Recital Award. In addition to his concert activities, Mr.Edelmann devotes a considerable amount of his time to teaching. He was a Professor of the Piano Faculty at New York University from 1996 to 2001 and currently is a Guest Professor of Piano at the Musashino Music Academy in Tokyo until March 2009.