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Act 2

Act 2

Eric Vloeimans' Oliver's Cinema

Label: V-Flow
Format: CD
Barcode: 0608917470123
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Catalog number: VF 01
Releasedate: 10-04-15
- Oliver's Cinema Act 2 is out!

- Oliver’s Cinema is a sonic adventure of lasting resonance, a cross-cultural concept, and a trio of unlikely instrumentation. It is a band that suggests a veritable world of sound with nothing more than trumpet, cello and accordion, an ingenuous blend of timbre and texture. The music of Oliver’s Cinema is so naturally effective that it seems to ask why no one has thought of this combination before.

- For Oliver’s Cinema, Vloeimans reached across borders—recruiting German cellist Jörg Brinkmann and Belgian accordionist Tuur Florizoone—and formed a team of surprising collusion. Each are melodic masters in their own right; each has learned to expand their musicality with a vocabulary of patience and surprise, light and shade. One measure of their compatibility is the unforced precision of the group’s “rhythm section”— Vloeimans’ tempo shifts, Brinkmann’s pizzicato patterns, Florizoone’s thumb-slaps on the accordion frame. Another can be found in the sonic handoffs from one instrument to the next: a sustained note on the cello echoed by the haunting, string-like sigh from the top end of the accordion; the accordion’s breathy runs replicated on the trumpet.

- Act 2 is the second outing for Oliver’s Cinema, an album of performances that are conversations as much as compositions—conversations shared by three old friends sitting around in the fading glow of the evening, friends who know each other almost too well. Their discussions have that ethereal, all-knowing quality and require a soul-stilling level of attention that is worth the time invested and emotional engagement.

Ashley Kahn, Grammy winner and author of A Love Supreme: The Story Of John Coltrane’s Signature Album, and other titles on music
Welcome to Oliver’s Cinema. Please find a seat and make yourself comfortable; Act 2 is about to start.  

We’re happy you could join us—tonight’s feature will be a memorable experience that will fire the imagination visually and emotionally as deeply and with as much pull as it does with music. Each performance will offer an evocative blend of sentiment, mood and melody. Expect a distinct, emotional clarity to these virtual landscapes with a minimum of clutter and distraction, and an intriguing range of musical flavors. Some will hear jazz as the primary note, many will mark a variety of classical and folkloric ideas passing through lime welcome visitors, finding a comfortable place within these performances. All will recognize a refreshing originality to Oliver’s Cinema that remains long after the listening, a retinal after-image for the ears and the heart that will stay with you long after the closing credits.

Oliver’s Cinema is a sonic adventure of lasting resonance, a cross-cultural concept, and a trio of unlikely instrumentation. It is a band that suggests a veritable world of sound with nothing more than trumpet, cello and accordion, an ingenuous blend of timbre and texture. The music of Oliver’s Cinema is so naturally effective that it seems to ask why no one has thought of this combination before.

Eric Vloeimans is the classically trained, jazz-infused trumpeter whose penchant for long tones, unhurried lyricism and sudden, vocal-like phrasing imbue his playing with a seasoned wisdom that defi es his years. In his native Holland, he is respected for his recordings and work on film soundtracks, and is celebrated for unusual collaborative projects that convincingly explore the overlap of classical and improvisational music. Anagrammatically and conceptually, he is the leader of Oliver’s Cinema, and as the name suggests, Vloeimans favors interior visualizations with a balance of whimsy and solemnity that serves as this trio’s musical signature. (Often, the cinematic is directly referenced, as here on Act 2 with their pensive treatment of Nino Rota’s 1968 theme from Romeo and Juliet.)

For Oliver’s Cinema, Vloeimans reached across borders—recruiting German cellist Jörg Brinkmann and Belgian accordionist Tuur Florizoone—and formed a team of surprising collusion. Each are melodic masters in their own right; each has learned to expand their musicality with a vocabulary of patience and surprise, light and shade. One measure of their compatibility is the unforced precision of the group’s “rhythm section”— Vloeimans’ tempo shifts, Brinkmann’s pizzicato patterns, Florizoone’s thumb-slaps on the accordion frame. Another can be found in the sonic handoffs from one instrument to the next: a sustained note on the cello echoed by the haunting, string-like sigh from the top end of the accordion; the accordion’s breathy runs replicated on the trumpet.

Act 2 is the second outing for Oliver’s Cinema, an album of performances that are conversations as much as compositions—conversations shared by three old friends sitting around in the fading glow of the evening, friends who know each other almost too well. Their discussions have that ethereal, all-knowing quality and require a soul-stilling level of attention that is worth the time invested and emotional engagement.

So sit back, let go of the day, and enjoy the musical images that are about to flow. Oliver’s Cinema welcomes you. Don’t forget to turn off your phone too—you won’t want to be interrupted.

Ashley Kahn, Grammy winner and author of A Love Supreme: The Story Of John Coltrane’s Signature Album, and other titles on music
Eric Vloeimans
Eric Vloeimans (Huizen, 1963) is an improvising trumpeter and composer who regards the term ‘jazz’ as too limiting to describe his music. His work is characterized by melodic and lyrical power, and a distinctive, individual sound that is called velvety or whispering in the more subdued pieces.

Between 1982 and 1988, Vloeimans studied at the Rotterdam Conservatory; classical trumpet at first, later the jazz course. In 1989 he took lessons in the US with Donald Byrd and formed part of the big bands of Frank Foster and Mercer Ellington.

In the early Nineties Vloeimans was regarded as a member of a younger generation of musicians who combine bebop with influences from rock and free improvisation, such as Michiel Borstlap, Benjamin Herman and Yuri Honing.

In 1998, the Edison-winning Bitches and Fairy Tales was released, recorded with pianist John Taylor, bassist Marc Johnson and drummer Joey Baron. Taylor is also featured on Umai from 2000. In 2001, Vloeimans won the coveted Boy Edgar Prize, and in 2001 the Bird Award of the North Sea Jazz Festival. The CD’s VoizNoiz 3 (with Michel Banabila, 2003), Summersault (with Fugimundi, 2006) and Gatecrashin’ (with Gatecrash, 2007) were also awarded Edisons. In addition, Eric was recipient of the Elly Ameling Prize as well as the Golden Nutcracker (2011)

From 2006/2007 Eric Vloeimans has been active with two much-praised formations: the chamber jazz trio Fugimundi (Anton Goudsmit guitar, Harmen Fraanje piano) and the electric band Gatecrash, in which rock and funk elements can be traced (Jeroen van Vliet keyboards, Gulli Gudmundsson bass, Jasper van Hulten drums). With the latter group, he employs electronic effects in his trumpet playing for the first time.

In addition, he continues to develop other projects, such as the band Oliver’s Cinema with accordion player Tuur Florizoone and cellist Jörg Brinkmann (CD available from August 2013, and a US tour in October 2014)) , and a duo with pianist Florian Weber,  with a CD release : Live at the Concertgebouw in 2011.

His broad range of interests has led Vloeimans to collaborate with artists from other musical worlds. In the pop music area, these include Fay Lovsky, Doe Maar, Spinvis, Jan Akkerman and trumpeter Kyteman (Colin Benders). Kytecrash, the combination of the latter’s hip-hop band and Gatecrash, resulted in successful performances and a CD in 2011.  He will be performing a series of concerts with British classical pianist Joanna MacGregor in the winter of 2013/2014.

Where world music is concerned, Vloeimans was involved in projects with flamenco guitarist Eric Vaarzon Morel, Latin pianist Ramon Valle, and the fado-inspired Pessoa of Fernando Lameirinhas.

Vloeimans has performed as a soloist with classical ensembles such as the Matangi Quartet, the Calefax Reed Quintet, the Metropole Orchestra, the Gelderland Orchestra, the Limburg Symphony Orchestra, the Holland Baroque Society, the Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra and the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra. 2011 saw the premiere of his first trumpet concerto, Evensong, with the Limburg Symphony Orchestra, orchestrated by Martin Fondse, and recorded for CD with the Netherlands Symphony Orchestra. Eric Vloeimans is also artistic director of the 2013 National Youth Jazz Orchestra.

May 2013

Tuur Florizoone
Although in the Low Countries the accordion is often still associated with corniness and banal hi-jinx, in other cultures it has been a fully respected instrument with a great expressive range for many years. Especially in the hands of a composer and improviser with imagination and taste, such as one of Belgium’s most beloved musicians, Tuur Florizoone. This has everything to do with his broad knowledge and interests, his charisma and tangible joy in performing, and his gift for touching the heart of the music as well as that of the listeners.

Florizoone (1978) has had classical piano lessons and studied jazz piano and composition at the conservatory. He gained some of his practical experience in Brazil, such as at the workshops of the great percussionist Nana Vasconcelos, and by accompanying circus, dance and theatre shows. He collaborated with heavyweights from the worlds of jazz (Philip Catherine, Garrett List), pop music (Stijn Meuris, Thé Lau), classical music (Claron McFadden, the Brussels Philharmonic) and the folk and world music scene (Luka Bloom, Carlos Nuñes). He demonstrated his mastery of mood and atmosphere, based on simple, directly appealing material, in film soundtracks such as Aanrijding in Moscou – which won him the public prize at the WORLD SOUNDTRACK AWARDS 2008 – and L’Amour des Moules. As an improviser, he’s at his best in open situations with a lot of freedom and interaction, like in the group Tricycle, the collective trio Massot/Florizoone/Horbaczewski, and in a duo with diatonic accordionist Didier Laloy.

Jörg Brinkmann
Young, classically trained string players with big, wide open ears have greatly enriched Dutch improvised music in the past years. One of them is the German cellist Jörg Brinkmann (1976), who has studied at the Arnhem conservatory. Just like the members of the ZAPP! string quartet, whom he frequently plays with, he get his inspiration from anywhere; for him the ‘jazz’ label is also too limiting. Brinkmann is equally capable of making essential contributions to pop bands, theatre orchestras or chamber music ensembles. Building on the technical innovations of improvising jazz musicians, he can deploy his cello as a (rhythm) guitar, or as a bass that lays down funk accents or swings in four-four time. When he colors the sound of his instrument with electronics, it’s done in a subtle and tasteful way. In his playing and his compositions a perfect fusion takes place of structure and personal variations, of cleanly bowed lyricism and lively rhythms, in which he doesn’t shy away from unusual time signatures either.

His musical character is faithfully expressed in his own trio with pianist Oliver Maas and percussionist Dirk-Peter Kölsch, with whom he recorded the album Ha! for ACT. In addition, he’s worked with Martin Fondse’s Starvinsky Orkestar, Michiel Braam’s Bik Bent Braam and many other adventurous jazz soloists.